Pickled Eggs

I just ate a pickled egg. It would be sad for me if that was the biggest news I had to report, however every column must start somewhere and this is where mine will begin.

 

I never knew pickled eggs existed until I was old enough to go to Carpenter’s Corner. I never would have considered eating an egg that was pickled except I’d already enjoyed a few cold beers and eating one seemed reasonable. This is similar to how I was first introduced to pickled gizzards and head cheese. I always liked the pickled egg ritual; Louise Carpenter would get an egg from the one gallon container in back of the bar, he’d then leave you the egg on a napkin with a salt and pepper shaker. I love the taste of those eggs. The nice snap of the white followed by the mellow rich taste of the yolk was perfect with the cold beer. One was rarely enough and they were only fifty cents so I enjoyed this little ritual whenever I could.

 

I forgot about pickled eggs until recently. My co-worker, Kay Nelson, brought me a sandwich bag of pickled eggs a few months ago. The contents looked so fresh and the eggs were accompanied by a few pickled onions which was a bonus. I planned to have two that night and save the rest for my wife but those eggs never saw our home. I decided then that I wanted to make pickled eggs a regular part of my life.

 

Making pickled eggs is very easy. My recipe is pretty standard; heat 3 cups vinegar, ¼ cup sugar, 2 tbsp pickling spice, 3 tsp salt until everything is dissolved. Divide one and a half dozen eggs and raw onions (to taste) between two jars then add the brine. Lisa’s sister gave us some Habanera peppers which were too hot for human consumption so I added them into the mix along with some of our own pickled peppers and left it in the refrigerator for aboutt a day. The eggs are fantastic and have just enough heat to make you feel raw and edgy when you eat them.

 

Pickled eggs are the perfect tool for use in romantic overtures. Remember how Tramp rolled a meatball to Lady in that favorite animated film? Although I do not roll a pickled egg with my nose, I do occasionally offer Lisa half an egg with salt or pepper. Not only do I prove my ability to provide, I also show that I can share and what woman doesn’t dissolve at such a display?

 

Pickled eggs are a nice gift. The receiver enjoys the initial batch and then may boil new eggs to re-fill the container; it’s like starter for sour dough bread. We gave my dad some eggs recently and he has re-filled it at least once so far. I’ve re-filled our jars several times and the eggs still pickle; the onions and peppers haven’t lost any of their kick, either. It’s an economical gift too as a jar of home made pickled eggs cost less than two dollars as opposed to store-bought which run a little over five dollars for a small jar.

 

Eggs are such a versatile food, and can be made in so many ways. Only one way can make you seem generous, attractive to the opposite sex and thrifty. I hope the next egg you eat is pickled.